Tuesday, January 24

the swinging sporran


Tomorrow is Burns Night, January 25th, the celebration of Scottish poet (and famous carouser) Robert Burns. Though dancing is not usually a part of the proceedings have been looking through this book above and its "lighthearted guide to the basic steps of scottish reels and country dances". It includes some background info on proper attire and conventions for attending a ceilidgh (pronounced kay-lee) but also hints at the reason why wearing Black Watch may be used as the default tartan for any wearer...
This legislation [the Dress Act of 1746 which forbade the wearing of tartan and the kilt -ed.] affected all Scots with the exception of those who had fought on the Government side (such as the soldiers of The Black Watch).
Won't rehash my previous Burns Night posts; see them all here.

2 comments:

HOM said...

"This legislation [the Dress Act of 1746 which forbade the wearing of tartan and the kilt -ed.] affected all Scots with the exception of those who had fought on the Government side (such as the soldiers of The Black Watch)."

Interestingly enough most modern scholars believe that the concept of "clan tartans" springs from the fact that Highland Regiments had to wear a uniform tartan. Most "clan tartans" are actually regimental tartans or based on them. The Black Watch tartan (earliest date 1749) is the most numerous progenitor, having both Jacobite and Traitor sets based on it.

SUM said...

Reminds me of the film "Winkle Goes Up The Kilties".